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Mitsubishi Outlander Compression Issues

Models Affected: Mitsubishi Outlander ZK, ZJ

Engine: 4J12 2.4 Petrol

Recently a customer’s vehicle presented with zero compression on cylinder 2, good compression on all other cylinders and the engine timing was still spot on.  The engine dropped cylinder 2 while cruising at 60kmh and under no unusual load or strain.  We removed the valve cover and the VVL (Variable Valve Lift) valve train unit and found a piece of a pin connecting the main rocker unit to the variable lift eccentric shaft failed, we also noted two other cylinders the same pins were working there way out and failure wasn’t too far away on these cylinders as well.  With this pin boss broken and the pin disengaged from the eccentric shaft,  the inlet valves are getting zero lift and not opening, resulting in the engine unable to build any compression in that cylinder.  A complete replacement VVL unit and camshaft was fitted, tappet clearances set (which is not as easy as it sounds), and we were back up and running again.  If you have a similar issue call Southside Cylinder Heads for the best service and advice on 07 33435899.  We service Brisbane, Logan, Gold Coast and all of Queensland.

Cylinder 2

4J12 Variable Lift Rocker Assembly

What It Should Look Like

The Pin On Cylinder 4 Also coming Out

 

Oil pump Upgrade 2.2 and 3.2 Ranger/BT-50

NOW AVAILABLE!!

Upgraded gear drive oil pump to suit Ford Ranger and Mazda BT-50 2.2 (P4At) and 3.2 (P5At)

Suits all 2011 on models

With the new generation 4 & 5 cylinder diesels ford introduced the variable pressure oil pump, which goes away from the traditional gear drive pumps we all know and instead utilizes a vane style pump allowing the oil pressure to vary according to engine RPM.

The variable pressure pump is a good idea in theory and helps improve engine efficiency, but there are two main drawbacks of this particular pump.   Firstly you have the 10 minute oil drain time limit which is not a great hassle if your aware of it, but to the unsuspecting home mechanic it can be a very expensive trap.  Second issue is the pumps are failing prematurely and oil pressure is lost to the entire engine, causing major engine damage.  From our experience the failure can happen at anytime and without warning, and if the driver doesn’t notice the engine light or oil pressure light within about 30 seconds, it means a trip to the engine builders for repairs.  Southside Cylinder heads can supply and fit the pumps for you.

Thankfully a revised oil pump has been released which converts the variable pressure back back to the good old gear drive pump.  The new design is much more robust and does away with the pesky 10 minute race the clock oil changes.  All Ford Ranger and Mazda BT50 3.2 engines built by Southside Cylinder Heads incorporates the new pump design, give us a call on (07) 3343 5899 to enquire.  Servicing Brisbane, Gold Coast, Sunshine Coast and Australia Wide.

Upgraded Gear Drive Pump

Old Failed Variable RPM Oil Pump Ranger BT-50

Engine Temperature Alarm

 

Engine Temperature Alarms  –  For Piece Of Mind

 

We are seeing an increasing call for aftermarket engine temperature monitors and alarms, this is because of two reasons.

1. More vehicles are being released that don’t have a traditional temperature gauge on the dashboard.  Manufacturers are replacing temperature gauges with warning lights on the dashboard if the engine gets too hot.  Often by the time the light is triggered, or indeed seen by the driver, the damage is already done and you could be up for expensive head gasket replacements or engine repairs.

2.  Cheap piece of mind.  Everyone is busy these days with a million things on your mind as you drive from place to place, meaning sometimes small warning lights on the dashboard go unnoticed.   The TM1 unit not only gives you a real time display of engine temperature, it also sounds an alarm when the engine temperature starts to climb to unsafe levels,

 

((( Audible))) Engine Temperature Alarm

Real time engine temperature monitoring

Suitable for  all Cars, Trucks, Boats, Bikes, Tractors & Machinery

Now also records the highest engine temperature reached

 Accurately displays engine temperature and alarms with a Warning light, Loud buzzer & Display messages if engine is overheating

The TM1 is ideal for alarming Engines, Gear boxes, Transmissions, Transfer boxes, Pumps, in fact any thing that operates between 1 to 125 degrees Celsius.

Takes temperature readings from the metal rather than the water, so if you run out of water you still get an accurate temperature reading

 

 

The unit has a neutral white LCD screen with an automatic back light so it blends into both old and new dash boards. It displays big numbers that are easy to read in either bright sunshine or at night. All functions and alarms are accompanied by individual display messages, including advanced messages such as ‘Sensor Not Connected’ should the sensor cable be cut.

The sensor fits like a washer under any convenient bolt on the engine that is near the heat source, here it rapidly detects the slightest changes in engine temperature.  The device is monitoring metal temperature rather than water temperature.  The warning alarm sensitivity can be set to suit your individual engine and needs.

The alarm is set by either observing the engines highest normal running temperature, or interrogating the Highest Temperature Reached function. Then the alarm is set to a higher temperature by using the push button on the front . Typically the alarm is set to between 5 and 10 degrees above the engines normal running temperature, this usually equates to the warning buzzer sounding at just one or two needle widths above the normal mark on most car temperature gauges.

Because you’re not breaking into the cooling system, the TM1 is the quickest, easiest and safest system on the market.   Setting the unit correctly is critical to the performance of the unit.  Contact Southside Cylinder Heads about fitting a unit in your vehicle today, it could just save you thousands.

 

The Importance Of Maintaining Your Engine

 Toyota_Kluger_rear_deepVehicle maintenance is of vital importance both for safety, longevity and performance, and today we want to talk about the importance of maintaining your engine and the surrounding components that make it possible for your engine to operate.

The engine is the heart of your car, and its fluids are its blood. In your own body, your blood has kidneys and a liver to keep the blood clean — aside from the oil filter, a car engine can’t clean its own fluids. That’s why it’s important to change an engine’s oil regularly, and to make sure that change happens before the oil gets too dirty. Dirty oil may suffice in the short term and things may go fine for a while, but eventually it will lead to disaster. Even small amounts of dirty buildup over time can lesson an engine’s lifespan.

Toyota Kluger 2GR-FE Engine

Your coolant is just as important.  Having a clean and correct mix of coolant increases the cooling efficiency and capability of your engine, and prevents rust and corrosion forming.  Your radiator and water pump also play an important part in this, the pump’s job is pretty self-explanatory, it pumps coolant through the engine, then through the radiator to be cooled and then back into the engine in a continues cycle.  If maintenance is lacking and part of your cooling system fails in its duty, major engine damage can happen in a matter of minutes.

For example, the engine block pictured is out of a 2010 Toyota Kluger with 79,000kms clocked.  Basic oil changes have been maintained but a lack of cooling system maintenance has resulted in a major engine overheat, so bad that the alloy in the block has separated from the cylinder walls. 

The repairs required to get this car back on the road came in at a little under $10,000.  Don’t let this happen to you, practice a good maintenance schedule with your trusted mechanic, and pay attention to what your engine is telling you. If your car’s gauges say the engine is getting too hot, the oil pressure is low, your check engine light is on, or it’s making a noise that it never used to make, don’t wait. Take it to a mechanic you trust.

 

 

Engine Block 2GR-FE

Trade Customer Rewards!!!!

have-a-drinkGive us a call to find out how you can have a drink on us this Easter long weekend.  Southside Cylinder Heads, Engine Reconditioning Australia is Queensland and Brisbane’s best for Cylinder head repairs and full engine rebuilds.  

Minimum repairs, standard rebuilds and performance upgrades are all catered for. Easter promotional offer is only valid for trade customers

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All About Cylinder Head Hardness

With the advancement in engine technology more components than ever before are being manufactured out of aluminium.  The 70’s and 80’s seen the introduction of aluminium cylinder heads into mainstream family cars and now almost all new engines use aluminium heads and in many cases an aluminium engine block as well.

metal-hardness-tester-th-130-250x250-1

Southside Cylinder Heads
Digital Hardness Tester

Although both strong and light, aluminium is also a relatively soft metal that needs to be alloyed with another metal in order to have enough hardness to be used in an engine.  Typical alloying compounds are silicon manganese, copper manganese and iron.

When we talk about cylinder head hardness it is basically the ability of the component to resist being permanently deformed when a load is applied. Testing the hardness of your cylinder head is a vital part of the reconditioning process and the most widely used hardness test in the automotive field is Brinell Scale.

Depending on the manufacturing process and alloying metals used, cylinder heads will have different hardness levels from new, so for instance a new Mazda 6 cylinder head may be 125hb but a Toyota Corolla head may be only 110hb.  You would expect a new cylinder head to be in the vicinity of 100-130hb.

The only accurate way to test your cylinder head hardness is with a calibrated digital tester.  Our testing is conducted in 3 spots on the gasket face of each cylinder head and the average result is recorded.  Industry standard minimum hardness is 65hb and any heads with a reading below this level are unsuitable for reconditioning and must be replaced.  Unfortunately many workshops still use the outdated and unreliable manual “ball tester” that relies on a ball bearing in a tube to bounce above a line.  This type of tester is relatively cheap but has proven to be inaccurate in determining a cylinder heads suitability for reconditioning.

What causes the hardness level to deteriorate?

The single biggest factor that effects your cylinder head hardness is excessive heat.  Most modern engines operate at a temperature of approximately 88°c – 105°c.  When your engine overheats and exceeds its normal operating range, the increased heat puts major stresses on the aluminium cylinder head and starts to deteriorate the hardness value of the head.

Once the temperature of the aluminium reaches about 200°c – 250°c permanent softening of the alloy begins and the hotter and longer your engine is exposed to these conditions the more damage is done.  To minimise the damaging effects of overheating be sure to switch off your engine at the first signs of overheating and have your vehicle checked.

What will happen if I use a soft head?

Using a cylinder head that is soft (tested at 65hb or less) greatly increases the likelihood of premature head gasket failure as it has lost its structural integrity and ability to withstand load and stresses that occur during engine operation.  As well as gasket failure a soft head may also be more susceptible to warping and cracking as the weakened component continues to be subjected to the high loads and stresses of the combustion engine.

A key sign to look out for is head bolt recess or indentation caused when the load applied by the head bolts is too great for the soft aluminium and the bolts will start to sink into the head. These bolts pulling through the aluminium will prevent the correct load being applied to the head gasket and failure will be imminent.

If you have overheated your engine and suspect the cylinder head hardness may be affected, or you just want to be on the safe side, bring your head in to us and we can do a hardness test while you wait (in most cases), and best of all its free!

For more information on cylinder head hardness check out: http://www.aagaskets.com.au/PDF/CylinderHeadResearchInvestigation.pdf