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Engine Temperature Alarm

 

Engine Temperature Alarms  –  For Piece Of Mind

 

We are seeing an increasing call for aftermarket engine temperature monitors and alarms, this is because of two reasons.

1. More vehicles are being released that don’t have a traditional temperature gauge on the dashboard.  Manufacturers are replacing temperature gauges with warning lights on the dashboard if the engine gets too hot.  Often by the time the light is triggered, or indeed seen by the driver, the damage is already done and you could be up for expensive head gasket replacements or engine repairs.

2.  Cheap piece of mind.  Everyone is busy these days with a million things on your mind as you drive from place to place, meaning sometimes small warning lights on the dashboard go unnoticed.   The TM1 unit not only gives you a real time display of engine temperature, it also sounds an alarm when the engine temperature starts to climb to unsafe levels,

 

((( Audible))) Engine Temperature Alarm

Real time engine temperature monitoring

Suitable for  all Cars, Trucks, Boats, Bikes, Tractors & Machinery

Now also records the highest engine temperature reached

 Accurately displays engine temperature and alarms with a Warning light, Loud buzzer & Display messages if engine is overheating

The TM1 is ideal for alarming Engines, Gear boxes, Transmissions, Transfer boxes, Pumps, in fact any thing that operates between 1 to 125 degrees Celsius.

Takes temperature readings from the metal rather than the water, so if you run out of water you still get an accurate temperature reading

 

 

The unit has a neutral white LCD screen with an automatic back light so it blends into both old and new dash boards. It displays big numbers that are easy to read in either bright sunshine or at night. All functions and alarms are accompanied by individual display messages, including advanced messages such as ‘Sensor Not Connected’ should the sensor cable be cut.

The sensor fits like a washer under any convenient bolt on the engine that is near the heat source, here it rapidly detects the slightest changes in engine temperature.  The device is monitoring metal temperature rather than water temperature.  The warning alarm sensitivity can be set to suit your individual engine and needs.

The alarm is set by either observing the engines highest normal running temperature, or interrogating the Highest Temperature Reached function. Then the alarm is set to a higher temperature by using the push button on the front . Typically the alarm is set to between 5 and 10 degrees above the engines normal running temperature, this usually equates to the warning buzzer sounding at just one or two needle widths above the normal mark on most car temperature gauges.

Because you’re not breaking into the cooling system, the TM1 is the quickest, easiest and safest system on the market.   Setting the unit correctly is critical to the performance of the unit.  Contact Southside Cylinder Heads about fitting a unit in your vehicle today, it could just save you thousands.

 

A Basic Guide to Engine Valve Failure

Auto-Engine-Valves-320x200

Engine Valves

The valves in your cylinder head are a vital component of your engine and undergo enormous stresses, opening and closing up to 2500 times every minute under normal operating conditions. When one or more of these valves are damaged, the result can be anything from reduced power and poor fuel consumption, to complete engine failure.  The two most common types of valve failure are bent/broken valves and burnt valves.

Bent Valves

The most common failure of valves is bending or breaking as a result of contact with the pistons. The valves contacting the top of a piston is due to incorrect engine synchronization caused by timing chain/belt breakage and incorrect fitting of new belts and chains. If you suspect your engine may have bent or broken valves, it is crucial not to attempt to start the engine as this may result in more costly damage being caused to the cylinder head, pistons and cylinder bores.

The bent valves above are a result of a fatigued timing belt that has broken. Your timing belt doesn’t last forever and needs to be replaced according to the manufacturer’s service guidelines. Replacing your timing belt is cheap insurance against costly engine damage.

Burnt valvesValve-Piston-Diagram

The other common type of valve failure is valve burn, or burnt valves. Essentially this is caused by combustion gases escaping between the valve and valve seat when they are not sealing correctly. The hot combustion gases are forced past the valve which starts to burn away the edge of the valve, progressively getting worse the longer it is left without being rectified. Normally this type of failure affects the exhaust valves only, but it can also damage the intake valves.

A burnt valve will cause issues with your vehicle’s performance and fuel consumption. Rough idle, reduced power, backfiring, and misfire are all symptoms of valve burn. If your engine is showing symptoms like these, we recommend you get your car checked by a trusted mechanic, as continual driving with a burnt valve will cause more damage to your engine, and will in turn cost more to repair in the long run.


Possible causes of burnt valves are:

Bent-Valves-Caused-By-A-Broken-Timing-Belt-320x200

Bent valves caused by broken timing belt

  • Excessive localized heat
  • Combustion gases escaping past the valve and concentrated at only one point
  • Irregular valve sealing with cylinder head valve seat. Carbon residues generated by irregular combustion (poor mixture) will appear at the seat region and will jeopardize the sealing between the valve and its seat
  • Deficient refrigeration is another factor, due to partial obstruction of the cylinder head cooling.  As a consequence, the valve is cooled inadequately
  • Incorrect valve clearance can jeopardize the valve sealing and also cause this type of failure
  • Running a dry fuel such as L.P.G resulting in inadequate lubrication of the valve seat, causing the valv
    A-Valve-Starting-To-Burn4

    A Valve Starting To Burn

    e seat to fail and consequently, the valves

To help prevent this type of failure, there are a few things you can do. Maintain a clean, efficient cooling system so the engine does not run too hot,  use good quality fuels to help prevent carbon build up on the valve seats, and have your mechanic regularly check the valve clearances are within specifications.

If your vehicle is using an aftermarket L.P.G fuel system, you must check that the engine is L.P.G compatible (most are NOT). In the event your engine is running L.P.G but is not L.P.G compatible, valve failure is imminent. It will generally be less costly to have your cylinder head removed and modified for L.P.G before the valves start to burn, rather than wait until the damage is done. Once the L.P.G modifications are complete, it will be safe to use

Burnt-Exhaust-Valve5

Burnt Exhaust Valve

the L.P.G without damaging your engine.